China Phuket Shrine vegetarian festival Veggie

The Legend of Phuket Vegetarian Festival

Home / Asia, Asian, living, Phuket, Thai, Thailand, Thailand Information, Travel, Travel & Guide / The Legend of Phuket Vegetarian Festival

During Oct 13-21, 2015 as the lunar calendar, it’s time for rite performing both body and mind. Vegetarian food is one of highlights.

Thailand, a large cultural melting pots, has become over several hundred years of Chinese migrants’ home.

Hokkiens, a Chinese from southern China, among other Chinese people in Thailand, have been located in southern provinces of Thailand, Phuket, Phang Nga, Krabi, Songkla and some other cities.

When those traditional beliefs have encountered the local’s, there have become a new tradition that is the Vegetarian festival extinguished them from others and grown a strong community down there.

Phuket’s vegetarian festival is one of tourist destinations, where lots of mind-blown ceremonies are there every year.

Why don’t we just open mind to something different and learn that these are one of human’s traditions?

Devotees gather at the Chinese Jui Tui Shrine at dawn ahead of a street procession as part of the annual Vegetarian Festival in the southern Thai town of Phuket on October 11, 2013. During the festival, which begins on the first evening of the ninth lunar month and lasts nine days, religious devotees slash themselves with swords, pierce their cheeks with sharp objects and commit other painful acts to purify themselves, taking on the sins of the community. AFP PHOTO/Christophe ARCHAMBAULT (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)
Devotees gather at the Chinese Jui Tui Shrine at dawn ahead of a street procession as part of the annual Vegetarian Festival in the southern Thai town of Phuket. During the festival, which begins on the first evening of the ninth lunar month and lasts nine days,  AFP PHOTO/Christophe ARCHAMBAULT (Photo by CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)

Veggie_9

Phuket vegetarian festival firstly took place in 1825 for stopping a epidermic killing lots of locals and Chinese mine workers, when somebody in a Chinese opera group performing there, suggested eating only veggies with specially cooked to stop the disease. That’s the way they began the festival, including religious ceremonies.

A devotee lights incense sticks at the Chinese Bang Neow Temple ahead of a street procession during the annual Vegetarian Festival in the southern Thai town of Phuket on September 29, 2014. During the festival, which begins on the first evening of the ninth lunar month and lasts nine days, religious devotees slash themselves with swords, pierce their cheeks with sharp objects and commit other painful acts to purify themselves, taking on the sins of the community. AFP PHOTO/Christophe ARCHAMBAULT (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)
Photo by CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images
PHUKET CITY, THAILAND - OCTOBER 10, 2005: Vegetarian Festival, celebrated by the Chinese community on Phuket Island, Sui Boon Tong Procession, praying people. (Photo by Josef Polleross/ASAblanca via Getty Images)
PHUKET CITY, THAILAND – OCTOBER 10, 2005: Vegetarian Festival, celebrated by the Chinese community on Phuket Island, Sui Boon Tong Procession, praying people. (Photo by Josef Polleross/ASAblanca via Getty Images)

“Mahsong”,another highlight Mahsong, god mediums, devoting their worship to all gods are showing how they are protected by the gods along the roads in Phuket, drawing lots of tourists every year.

The mahsongs are from 20 Chinese shrines around the island, serving the gods believed coming down on earth to help human from troublesome.

Some of the largest shrines.

Jui Tui Dao Bo Geng Shrine :

Soi Romanee Phuket Town

Bang Neow Shrine :

Bang Niao Intersection, Muang District

Guan Tae Gun Shrine :

Ban Sapam, Phuket

RANONG, THAILAND - 2013/10/11: Devotees worship 'Mahsong' during a procession of the annual Vegetarian Festival in Ranong city. Mahsong are the people who invite the spirits of gods to possess their bodies. (Photo by Atid Kiattisaksiri/LightRocket via Getty Images)
Photo by Atid Kiattisaksiri/LightRocket via Getty Image
Devotees of the Chinese Jui Tui Shrine take part in a street procession marking the annual Vegetarian Festival in the southern town of Phuket on October 21, 2012. During the festival, which begins on the first evening of the ninth lunar month and lasts nine days, religious devotees slash themselves with swords, pierce their cheeks with sharp objects and commit other painful acts to purify themselves, taking on the sins of the community. AFP PHOTO/PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Devotees of the Chinese Jui Tui Shrine take part in a street procession marking the annual Vegetarian Festival in the southern town of Phuket on October 21, 2012. During the festival, which begins on the first evening of the ninth lunar month and lasts nine days, religious devotees slash themselves with swords, pierce their cheeks with sharp objects and commit other painful acts to purify themselves, taking on the sins of the community. AFP PHOTO/PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo by PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)

 

PHUKET, THAILAND - SEPTEMBER 29: Vegetarian festival devotees of Jui Tui shrine parade through the streets as firecrackers go off on September 29, 2014 in Phuket, Thailand. Ritual Vegetarianism in Phuket Island traces its roots back to the early 1800's. The annual festival begins on the first evening of the ninth lunar month and lasts for nine days. Participants in the festival perform acts of body piercing as a means of shifting evil spirits from individuals onto themselves and bring the community good luck. The ritualized mutilation is performed at a local Buddhist shrine under a trance-like state and is careful supervised. (Photo by Borja Sanchez-Trillo/Getty Images)
PHUKET, THAILAND – SEPTEMBER 29: Vegetarian festival devotees of Jui Tui shrine parade through the streets as firecrackers go off on September 29, 2014 in Phuket, Thailand. Ritual Vegetarianism in Phuket Island traces its roots back to the early 1800’s. The annual festival begins on the first evening of the ninth lunar month and lasts for nine days. Participants in the festival perform acts of body piercing as a means of shifting evil spirits from individuals onto themselves and bring the community good luck. The ritualized mutilation is performed at a local Buddhist shrine under a trance-like state and is careful supervised. (Photo by Borja Sanchez-Trillo/Getty Images)

 

PHUKET CITY, THAILAND - OCTOBER 9, 2005: Vegetarian Festival, celebrated by the Chinese community on Phuket Island, Bang Neow Temple, climbing on blades. (Photo by Josef Polleross/ASAblanca via Getty Images)
PHUKET CITY, THAILAND – OCTOBER 9, 2005: Vegetarian Festival, celebrated by the Chinese community on Phuket Island, Bang Neow Temple, climbing on blades. (Photo by Josef Polleross/ASAblanca via Getty Images)

 

TAE GUN TAE TAI CHINESE SHRINE, PHUKET, THAILAND - 2013/10/13: Devotees walk across hot coals at the Chinese shrine of Tae Gun Tae Tai during the annual Vegetarian Festival in Phuket, Thailand. The traditional Chinese vegetarian festival emphasizes merit making and ritual cleansing of the body to mark the nine-day-long festival. It also features face-piercing, spirit mediums, and strict vegetarianism. (Photo by David Longstreath/LightRocket via Getty Images)
TAE GUN TAE TAI CHINESE SHRINE, PHUKET, THAILAND – 2013/10/13: Devotees walk across hot coals at the Chinese shrine of Tae Gun Tae Tai during the annual Vegetarian Festival in Phuket, Thailand. The traditional Chinese vegetarian festival emphasizes merit making and ritual cleansing of the body to mark the nine-day-long festival. It also features face-piercing, spirit mediums, and strict vegetarianism. (Photo by David Longstreath/LightRocket via Getty Images)

 

Veggie_10

 

Like us on Facebook!