English Incorrect pronunciations English lesson English pronunciation Mispronounced misspelled

32 English Words Mostly Mispronounced by Foreigners (2)

Home / Asian, Lifestyle, living / 32 English Words Mostly Mispronounced by Foreigners (2)

30 English Words Always Mispronounced (1)

MThai English has just introduced what Jakub Marian who wrote a book about English Pronunciation rounded up 32 English Words Mostly Mispronounced by Foreigners (1). Here is the later part ending of all 32 words.

1960s 1970s BASSET HOUND...
1960s 1970s BASSET HOUND…

Let’s see and learn.

#17 Hyperbole

/haɪˈpɜːbəli/ (haay-pə-ə-bə-lee) (UK), /haɪˈpɜrbəli/ (haay-pər-bə-lee) (US) ; don’t confuse this word with a hyperbola, a geometrical shape. Hyperbole is a form of exaggeration, and it doesn’t rhyme with a bowl.

#18 Antipodes

/ænˈtɪpədiːz/ (æn-tip-ə-deez) ; a word describing two points which are directly opposite to each other on a sphere. For some reason, it doesn’t rhyme with an “antipode”, which is the singular form of it and which does rhyme with words like “mode” or “code”.

#19 Gauge

/geɪdʒ/ (geydzh) ; this word is especially useful to guitarists that speak about string gauges (i.e. how thick they are). It is pronounced as if the “u” were not there.

Close up of gauge on copper still in distillery
Close up of gauge on copper still in distillery

#20 Greenwich

/ˌgrɛnɪtʃ/ (gren-itch) ; you probably know this word from the Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) time standard. Just remember that there is no green witch in Greenwich.

Meridian line, National Maritime Museum, London, United Kingdom
Meridian line, National Maritime Museum, London, United Kingdom

#21 Yosemite

/joʊˈsɛmɪti/ (yoh-sem-it-ee) ; Yosemite National Park is well known around the Globe. Although there certainly is at least one mite somewhere in the park, there is none in the name.

#22 Boolean

/ˈbuːlɪən/ (boo-li-ən) ; every programmer knows this word, but many pronounce it wrong.

#23 Bayesian

/ˈbeɪziən/ (bey-zee-ən) ; if you are a mathematician, like me, you may be pronouncing this word incorrectly, as I used to.

#24 Paradigm

/ˈpærədaɪm/ (pær-ə-daaym) ; the pronunciation is quite natural, but some people are ‘digging’ this word a little bit too much. There is no ‘dig’ sound inside it.

#25 Elite

/ɪˈliːt/ (ih-leet) ; elite people are certainly not a “lite” version of the population. Don’t rhyme them with it.

#26 Debris

/ˈdɛbriː/ (deb-ree) (UK), /dəˈbri/ (də-bree) (US) ; this words has retained its original French pronunciation, so the final “s” is not pronounced.

#27 Infamous

/ˈɪnfəməs/ (in-fə-məs) ; although the word is just “famous” with the prefix “in-” stuck in the front, it is not pronounced so.

#28 Epitome

/ɪˈpɪtəmi/ (ih-pit-ə-mee) ; this somewhat less common word means “someone who is a prototypical example of a group of people”. Although you could fill a tome with a list of epitomes, you cannot rhyme it with them.

#29 Facade

/fəˈsɑːd/ (fə-saad) ; this word, meaning the front of a building, originates in French, and the pronunciation is still close to the French one.

The tapestries showing portraits of blessed nuns (from left) St Marie Alphonsine Ghattas, St Emilie de Villeneuve, St Maria Cristina of the Immaculate Conception and St Mariam Bawardy are seen on the façade of St Peter's basilica during a papal mass for the canonization of four nuns whose two lived in Ottoman Palestine, on May 17, 2015 at St Peter's square in Vatican. Pope Francis will declare four nuns as Saints today, two nuns from Palestine St Marie Alphonsine Ghattas from Jerusalem and St Mariam Bawardy from Ibilin village in the Galilee, both of whom lived in the 19th century, St Emilie de Villeneuve from France and St Maria Cristina of the Immaculate Conception from Italy. AFP PHOTO / ALBERTO PIZZOLI (Photo credit should read ALBERTO PIZZOLI/AFP/Getty Images)
The tapestries showing portraits of blessed nuns (from left) St Marie Alphonsine Ghattas, St Emilie de Villeneuve, St Maria Cristina of the Immaculate Conception and St Mariam Bawardy are seen on the façade of St Peter’s basilica during a papal mass for the canonization of four nuns whose two lived in Ottoman Palestine, on May 17, 2015 at St Peter’s square in Vatican. Pope Francis will declare four nuns as Saints today, two nuns from Palestine St Marie Alphonsine Ghattas from Jerusalem and St Mariam Bawardy from Ibilin village in the Galilee, both of whom lived in the 19th century, St Emilie de Villeneuve from France and St Maria Cristina of the Immaculate Conception from Italy. AFP PHOTO / ALBERTO PIZZOLI (Photo credit should read ALBERTO PIZZOLI/AFP/Getty Images)

#30 Awry

/əˈraɪ/ (ə-raay) ; this word shares a common root with “wry”, which means (among others) “abnormally bent or turned”. Awry means also “with a turn or twist to one side” or also “away from the expected or proper direction” (for example in “Our plans went awry”).

#31 Quay

/kiː/ (kee) (UK), in the US also /keɪ/ (kei) or /kweɪ/ (kwei) ; quay is the part of a harbour where ships can dock; it is therefore one of the ‘key parts’ of a harbour.

Merlion Park, Singapore
Merlion Park, Singapore

Quay

#32 Niche

/niːʃ/ (neesh) (UK), /nɪtʃ/ (nitch) (US) ; this word, meaning a shallow recess or simply a nice place or position, is also often used in the marketing business to describe the field of interest of a website (and that’s how I met it). Its pronunciation can be somewhat unexpected.

Follow us on MThai English Facebook!!!